Quieter Neighbourhoods

The statutory consultation for the Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood trial is now under way and comments can be submitted online or by post. People can comment more than once. The trial is initially due to last for six months, but if modified might be prolonged. On the other hand, it could be stopped before six months is up, as has occurred in some other boroughs. The council has made it clear that - despite claims to the contrary on social media - the emergency services have not objected, but if they do raise any issues during the trial the scheme will be suitably modified.

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For more than ten years, since a one-way system was introduced in streets between Green Lanes and Wolves Lane, the residents of Grenoble Gardens have had to endure queues of cars in their narrow residential road. In 2013 the council consulted on options for solving the problem, but nothing came of this. This report investigates the roots of the problem, the fate of the consultation, and possible solutions.

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All of us, to greater or lesser extent, shape the world that children have to grow up in. And, without our realising it, our lifestyle and behaviour might be contributing to the problems that lead to so many children growing up obese, unfit, unhealthy and with poor mental health. Instead of blaming their parents, we should consider whether we are part of the problem.

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A public notice published in this week's Enfield Independent gives notice that five experimental traffic orders relating to the Fox Lane Quieter Neighbourhood Area will come into effect on 7th September.

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Hal Haines draws a parallel between last week's protests against Enfield's first low-traffic neighbourhood and the situation in the Netherlands 50 years ago, when Amsterdam's streets too were dominated by cars. The Stop the Child Killings campaign that began in 1971 has shaped road design in the Netherlands ever since, making it unthinkable not to design out the possibility of taking a short cut through residential areas. The UK solved the child deaths problem by turning streets into no-go areas for children, but at a cost in terms of health, both physical and mental.

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