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    • Adding a splash of colour
    • The Palmers Green crossing has now been installed, outside the Fox in Green Lanes. It was designed by Patrick Samuel. Information about Patrick and his design from the : Patrick Samuel has named his design for Palmers Green "Changing Perspectives". "Palmers Green is more than just houses, roads and parks.It is home to people of all walks of life, origins and orientations. Changing Perspectives represents the diversity of this community, its openness and attitudes... So, the artwork incorporates the colours of Pride, BLM and neurodiversity, and last but not least the many green spaces that allow us to relax and come together. "Changing Perspectives is inspired by the works of Escher, Picasso and Haring. Bold, distinct colours, interlocking tessellations and faces you can see from any direction that show, however different our outlook on life, we’re living in the same community. Symbolically and literally, it really is about changing perspectives and I hope people enjoy and engage with it with as much pleasure as I had creating it. " Patrick Samuel Patrick Samuel is an exhibiting artist and musician with autism and ADHD. Having returned to art after a 20-year break, he...
    • In Other Subjects / Miscellaneous
    • Author PGC Webmaster
    • Yesterday 15:09
    • Commmunity clean-up on Bridge Drive
    • Volunteers survey the results of their hard work during the Palmers Green Action Team community cleanup on Saturday morning. Why do people expect others to clear up their mess? Do they just drop rubbish on the floor at home? And don't say it's because the council are collecting rubbish less often. Littering was just as bad when the bins were emptied every week. They could be emptied every day and it wouldn't make any difference.
    • In Other Subjects / Community Groups and Community Events
    • Author PGC Webmaster
    • Yesterday 14:40
    • Road signs go walkies
    • I think Bill's misinterpreted what I wrote. The driver going at 40mph was going in the wrong direction, so particularly dangerous. My observation of our street (Park Avenue) is that traffic probably is a bit lower than it was before lockdown, while outer London traffic levels are now generally higher than they were before lockdown. If that's the case, then the one-way system seems to be having a positive effect. Drivers going too fast along Park Avenue (in either direction) is still a problem, but I don't think it's any worse than it was before the one-way was introduced. I think speed humps are probably the only way of stopping this. As Norma has written, the effect of the one-way system on Windsor and Osborne has been very positive. Previously there were angry standoffs between drivers going in opposite directions. The current situation where signs appear and disappear is confusing for drivers and must be creating a hazard. The council needs to make sure they stay in place or preferably put in permanent signs asap, because even when the signs are in place some drivers regard them as not applying to them and simply drive past the no entry signs. I think there's little...
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Road Traffic
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • 16 Oct 2020 15:16
    • Road signs go walkies
    • Living in one of these roads, I am one of a number of local residents who are supportive of the one way systems becoming permanent. Road rage from drivers trying to pass each other on roads that are plainly too narrow is not fun and we have noticed an appreciable difference for the better except, of course, for those drivers who believe they do need to heed local restrictions and are creating greater danger.
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Road Traffic
    • Author Norma Clayton
    • 16 Oct 2020 09:50
    • Are FOBP destroying Broomfield Park?
    • I am not a Friend of Broomfield Park (FoBP) but am aware of the considerable voluntary efforts undertaken across PG (and wider) by many, and not least FoBP and how that personal choice can be reversed by adverse community reaction. Guy Harrowell concludes Broomfield Park is “being destroyed” by the FoBP (.) Words have impact, so let’s look at the background to this. Parks are non-statutory spend for local authorities so are at risk. Only yesterday Enfield’s published draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment Methodology has Metropolitan Open Land, ie most of our parks, as a potentially suitable space for housing. Unlikely perhaps, but who knows. And then what of the efforts of the FoBP to bolster the input of the one or two part time gardeners who would otherwise be the sum total of input to the huge space? Well certainly not complete but from what I know I can include in a list: Development and management of - an award winning conservatory - an award winning orchard - an apiary - a community café (now separately managed) - wild space and growing spaces ongoing pressure to enhance the playground facilitating the fixing of a pump and pipework to hopefully...
    • In Other Subjects / Parks and Open Spaces
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 16 Oct 2020 09:22
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • I live in the Fox Lane LTN. It is the most outrageously pompous scheme going. To suggest it's for the children is ridiculous. There are 2 huge parks easily accessible either side of Fox Lane. Although one of them is being destroyed by the friends of Broomfield park. I am not a rat! if I want to travel from where i live in Conway road to Winchmore Hill, the most direct route was down broad walk, it isn't a cut through if it is the most direct route. I now have to sit on Aldermans Hill and then wait at The Triangle. With the introduction of the cycle lanes along Green Lanes, these roads are now congested and snarled up. What normally took me 5 minutes now takes 23 minutes!!! Yes, the air maybe cleaner ON YOUR street but what about all the residents in Aldermans Hill, The Bourne N14, High Street N14. Cars are now sitting in congestion, polluting whilst stationary. It's all well and good saying that these journeys aren't necessary, but the figures have been deliberately designed to mislead you. The council will have you believe that during March to July, people favoured cycling and walking. Agreed, we were in full lockdown, advised not to use public transport and there were no cars...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Guy Harrowell
    • 15 Oct 2020 15:00
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • Just wanted to add my opposition to this ridiculous scheme. The main problem I have with it is the fact that the (mostly wealthy) people living on the leafy Lakes estate are benefitting from quieter, less polluted streets while the rest of us have to suffer from noisier, more polluted streets. My formerly quiet, residential street has seen a large rise in traffic as cars cut through from Green Lanes to Hedge Lane to avoid traffic jams. Just to add - I cycle a lot and rarely drive, and I can still see how incredibly unfair this scheme is.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Tom Le Bas
    • 15 Oct 2020 11:08
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • I did a survey of the main roads in the area of N21 and N13 this week during the rush hour and beyond to see the impact that the Fox Lane QN was having and also took supporting photos. I also collated feedback from other residents on what they saw as I think this is the only way to prove one way or the other how the scheme is functioning and whether it is providing any benefits. The report in an edited form has been submitted to the council and I am going to continue monitoring the area when time allows.Here are the top line comments.1. Survey of the area took place between 8.30-10am morning of 13 10 202. Traffic heading towards Green Lanes down Bourne Hill was very congested and stationery much of the time so polluting the area. The tailback went almost as far as Broadwalk.Think a lot of this is due to the closure of Fox Lane at Green Lanes and for many people trying to get to the A406 at the Gt Cambridge Roundabout this is causing major issues.3. In the opposite direction the tailback from Southgate went up to Greenway.In both instances a mixture of private and business vehicles4. Asked bin lorry crew what they thought and they said their journey was delayed by 15-30 mins. Since...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Neil Littman
    • 15 Oct 2020 09:02
    • Road signs go walkies
    • I actually thought the one-way system was a good idea. I rarely drive down those roads but thought a long time ago that they should use the system further down Green Lanes just south of the A406 where the roads are too narrow for two vehicles to pass by. However I also wondered if there were no legally binding traffic management orders in force on the roads and it was an 'informal' arrangement until such time as the council enforced a new scheme.
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Road Traffic
    • Author Neil Littman
    • 15 Oct 2020 08:46
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • I cycled quite a few streets on the Fox Lane neighbourhood this morning - 12th October 20120 - just to get some exercise because I'm well into my eighties and find cycling easier than walking, and thought that the little traffic I came across was calmer than I've been accustomed too. Perhaps it was just chance, or the time I travelled, but it was pleasant feeling that little bit safer. I'll make more reports/comments as time passes. Let's us hope, as KB commented, '.... that the direction of travel is constant'.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author David Hughes
    • 12 Oct 2020 23:18
    • Traffic has been increasing at an unsustainable ra...
    • For those interested in this kind of thing, the government has recently published national road traffic data and trends up to 2019. It’s at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/road-traffic-estimates-in-great-britain-2019 There’s a lot of detail but some key trends are: From 2002, despite a broadly linear increase in population and a greater but more wobbly increase in the numbers of cars owned: • Car traffic remained roughly level until 2009-10, when it increased and then accelerated in 2012 (13.3% increase since 2012), outstripping both population and car stock. In other words, miles per car increased from 2012, having been slowly declining since 2002. The reasons are complex, but fuel duty and the cost of driving has remained static or decreased while other costs have gone up. • Car traffic on (national) urban minor roads has increased by 25.6% since 2009. Van traffic has increased by a greater percentage, but since cars account for over 80% of urban minor road traffic, they also account for the majority of increase in overall traffic. Getting closer to home, you can get graphs by region and local authority by following the links from here:...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Tony Maddox
    • 12 Oct 2020 22:53
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • Less describing a utopia than what on the face of it appears to be the early winding up of a temporary Covid inspired Streetscape measure versus something looking much more permanent. But with HMG intent plus that of the last two London Mayors in their Spatial and Transport strategies, the generational domination of car transport in planning and associated transport investment has ended. Locally we see this in the transport budget of Enfield necessarily fitting in with London’s overarching strategy – call it Mini Holland, residential cells, quieter neighbourhoods or LTN’s, all such now falling under its Healthy Streets umbrella, and it’s been clear for years. That should come as no surprise as I’ve been pointing it out on here, and encouraging input to the long since ended consultations for at least as long. There’s now the opportunity to input to the Fox Lane LTN trial, opening today, I believe. Again, I’d encourage evidenced views to be supplied, this time to our own council. Within all of this here is no demonization of the car driver that I know of – although a minority absolutely deserve it – rather their relative deprioritisation. All the “why’s” are...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Oct 2020 13:28
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • Was my response "timely" because the announcement was made on the 8th, and my post on the 9th? The main point was that this was a 'Streetspace' scheme being closed early - due to lower than expected take-up by cyclists and an overly negative knock-on effect for other road users. If there were less than the expected number of cyclists on that temporary 'Streetspace' stretch then it seems very likely that they were not using the lane less than a couple of hundred metres away on the same road outside the British Library. I don't want to be combative, but you seemed to be describing some new utopia while just a few hundred metres away a 'Streetspace' scheme is now being removed because it created "chaos". It doesn't quite add up, does it. I'm not totally against the principles involved with the LTNs and I am a cyclist, pedestrian and public transport user too, so I 'get it'. But I am also a private car owner, making use of that option when the others are not suitable or available. The insidious demonisation of the private car user is very divisive, and I resent being referred to as a 'Rat Runner' when I am simply travelling between my home and elsewhere, so advocates of the LTNs...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Alan Thomas
    • 11 Oct 2020 17:17
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood moves a step cl...
    • I am just adding my voice to those who oppose this ridiculous and illogical scheme. The arguments about greater congestion, increasing pollution, longer journey times, added daily stress of travelling, etc, have already been well made. I have not read anything convincing that supports the imposition of this scheme that would be of benefit to the wider community of PG. I see there are some that suggest we might all start using bikes and public transport that will create some new utopian world. Well, we have a cycle lane that is barely used (waste of money) and anyone using public transport will readily tell you how appalling these services are..... and how expensive! And right now who really wants to be on over crowded buses and trains with the increasing COVID risk. In my view the council would be better focusing its resources on more important issues such as schools, and social care. If they really want to make our streets better, then perhaps clean them, repair the pavements, and empty the bins ore often.... that would be a good start!
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Steve Coupland
    • 10 Oct 2020 21:39

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